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Wednesday, January 9, 2008

Michael Pollan at Joseph Beth, 1/12/08

Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food will be at Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Rookwood Commons on Saturday, 1/12 at 1 PM. They expect a big turnout, so line letters are recommended if you want an autograph. I might just go to hear him speak. I read Omnivore on one leg of a trip to Hawaii in 2006, and it really made me think about local, sustainable food-- it might be a reread after I read Defense, as I hear somewhat mixed reviews about Defense compared to Omnivore. Has anyone read this book? What do you think?

2 comments:

Renee said...

I haven't quite finished "Eating," which is quite a bit shorter than Omnivore. It basically takes on "nutritionism," the current state of research, where foods aren't looked at as "food," but as bundles of nutrients. And -- oops -- the scientists turned out to be wrong about fat, which isn't a satanic food; and about carbs, which seem to have created the obesity epidemic. He's preaching to the choir, but it's interesting to read someone taking on the food establishment (scientists AND marketers) and basically saying the emperor has no clothes. Worth reading, I think.

Julie said...

Hi, Renee!

He'd be preaching to the choir with me, too, but I'm looking forward to reading it. I'm tired of diets being composed of processed foods to lose weight, or simply be convenient! Why don't we learn proper portions, which foods to eat regularly, which foods to eat sparingly, how to eat minimally processed foods?

Welcome, by the way!

Wednesday, January 9, 2008

Michael Pollan at Joseph Beth, 1/12/08

Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food will be at Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Rookwood Commons on Saturday, 1/12 at 1 PM. They expect a big turnout, so line letters are recommended if you want an autograph. I might just go to hear him speak. I read Omnivore on one leg of a trip to Hawaii in 2006, and it really made me think about local, sustainable food-- it might be a reread after I read Defense, as I hear somewhat mixed reviews about Defense compared to Omnivore. Has anyone read this book? What do you think?

2 comments:

Renee said...

I haven't quite finished "Eating," which is quite a bit shorter than Omnivore. It basically takes on "nutritionism," the current state of research, where foods aren't looked at as "food," but as bundles of nutrients. And -- oops -- the scientists turned out to be wrong about fat, which isn't a satanic food; and about carbs, which seem to have created the obesity epidemic. He's preaching to the choir, but it's interesting to read someone taking on the food establishment (scientists AND marketers) and basically saying the emperor has no clothes. Worth reading, I think.

Julie said...

Hi, Renee!

He'd be preaching to the choir with me, too, but I'm looking forward to reading it. I'm tired of diets being composed of processed foods to lose weight, or simply be convenient! Why don't we learn proper portions, which foods to eat regularly, which foods to eat sparingly, how to eat minimally processed foods?

Welcome, by the way!

Wednesday, January 9, 2008

Michael Pollan at Joseph Beth, 1/12/08

Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food will be at Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Rookwood Commons on Saturday, 1/12 at 1 PM. They expect a big turnout, so line letters are recommended if you want an autograph. I might just go to hear him speak. I read Omnivore on one leg of a trip to Hawaii in 2006, and it really made me think about local, sustainable food-- it might be a reread after I read Defense, as I hear somewhat mixed reviews about Defense compared to Omnivore. Has anyone read this book? What do you think?

2 comments:

Renee said...

I haven't quite finished "Eating," which is quite a bit shorter than Omnivore. It basically takes on "nutritionism," the current state of research, where foods aren't looked at as "food," but as bundles of nutrients. And -- oops -- the scientists turned out to be wrong about fat, which isn't a satanic food; and about carbs, which seem to have created the obesity epidemic. He's preaching to the choir, but it's interesting to read someone taking on the food establishment (scientists AND marketers) and basically saying the emperor has no clothes. Worth reading, I think.

Julie said...

Hi, Renee!

He'd be preaching to the choir with me, too, but I'm looking forward to reading it. I'm tired of diets being composed of processed foods to lose weight, or simply be convenient! Why don't we learn proper portions, which foods to eat regularly, which foods to eat sparingly, how to eat minimally processed foods?

Welcome, by the way!